horror

Interview on Fright Girl Winter

I was interviewed by Sonora Taylor for Women in Horror Month for the online book festival Fright Girl Winter. It gets pretty saucy and esoteric!

“…many people use the ideas of good/evil people and entities to create meaning and structure in their lives through religion, fiction, and other belief systems. I believe this is a false, and ultimately fascist, dichotomy that needs to go.”

– Me from the interview ๐Ÿ™‚

Check out the interview here!

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Free Books! Multi-author Giveaways

My book The Supposed Conjuring of the Cornfield Creeps is a part of two huge book giveaway promotions this month. A group of horror and thriller writers have gotten together to give away free bo oks, short stories and sample chapters, in exchange for joining their email list. I downloaded a bunch of them, and based on the first few pages I’ve included a preliminary recommendation for each promo. But I’m sure there are other good I missed, so please click the links below to see if anything catches your eye. Both giveaways end in mid-January, so get to them while you can!

UPDATE: The giveaway has ended. My book is still available for free here

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The nuckelavee is a fearsome sea monster found on Scotland’s Northern Isles that, when on land, has been described as humanoid rider fused with a horse, skinless with black blood coursing through yellow veins. Its breath wilts crops and is responsible for epidemics and drought. Image: michael221 on Deviant Art CC-BY-SA

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Rusalkas are water spirits from Slavic folklore, who appear as a pretty young girls with long hair. In some versions of lore, Rusalkas are the souls of drowned women or unclean spirits who lure men into water, and drown them by entangling their body with their long red hair. Image: Ivan Bilibin

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After witnessing a mesmerist induce a trance, Edgar Allan Poe included it in his story The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar. In the tale, a dying man is put into a trance and able to speak and move his “swollen black tongue” after death. The tale was written like a medical case study.

At the time, Poe was a journalist and the story was taken as a news report, never being explicitly presented as fiction. It was even reprinted in London’s Sunday Times with the headline: Mesmerism in America: Astounding and Horrifying Narrative, helping legitimize and popularize mesmerism.

Source is Occult America by Mitch Horowitz. It’s a fantastic read, and highly recommended!

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Mahr bin Hafaf is a jinn from India who would make wine and convince men to drink. Heโ€™d encourage them to play harps, lie, murder, and commit all sorts of other sins. King Solomon ordered him to be bound with chains. From Marvels of Things Created and Miraculous Aspects of Things Existing, 18th century. โ €

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In Gnosticism, the seven Archons are demons and rulers of realms within the ‘Kingdom of Darkness’. They play an important role in Gnostic cosmology, and are each associated with a different planet. They also prevent souls from leaving the material realm. โ €

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Wamidal is a demon depicted in the Compendium Of Demonology and Magic (1775). I wasnโ€™t able to find any information on this demon. The grimoire it came from was most likely created to be sold as a rare book, as opposed to an educational source. So Wamidal may not be a genuine demon. But who’s to say what makes a โ€œgenuineโ€ demon? โ €

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Gaap or Tap is a fallen angel and one of the 72 spirits of Solomon. As an angel he belonged to the Order of Powers. He poses as a doctor to women and makes them lust after men. He has many other powers, including: stealing familiars from magicians, telling the past and future, teaching philosophy and liberal sciences, teleporting people from one country to another, making people invisible, causing people to go senseless, inspiring love and hatred, and consecrating under the dominion of the infernal king Amaimon. These abilities likely made him a popular demon to summon among conjurers. From Dictionnaire Infernal, 1863.โ €


๐Ÿ“– Purchase Book (affiliate link, free digital version linked above)

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Yan-gant-y-tan has five candles on the five fingers of his right hand that he uses to illuminate his nightly wanderings. Seeing him is a bad omen and can be avoided by leaving some gold off the path for him to steal. From Dictionnaire Infernal, 1863โ €


๐Ÿ“– Purchase Book (affiliate link, free digital version linked above)

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