satanic

An illustration of a witches sabbath with the Devil seated in the center from Laurent Bordelon’s satirical work A History of the Ridiculous Extravagancies of Monsieur Oufle, 1710. Similar to Don Quixote, the titular character reads too many books, in this case books on “Magick, the Black-Art, Daemoniacks, Conjurers, Witches etc”, and it rots his brain, causing him to have fantastic delusions. Image: University of Glasgow Library. Full French text: archive.org


📖 Purchase Book (affiliate link, free digital version linked above)

Permalink

The Adversary is an archetype found across cultures, manifesting as figures such as Satan, the Devil, Iblis, Mephistopheles, and Samael. Sometimes depicted as separate from God and other times an agent of them, this figure represents the inclination of evil in humanity.

Images: Hell, Hans Memling, 1485 | Satan, Gustave Doré, in John Milton’s Paradise Lost, 1866 | Adam and the Angels watched by Iblis, Abū Jaʿfar Muḥammad ibn Jarīr al-Ṭabarī, 1415 | Jacob Wrestles with the Angel Samael, Gustave Doré, 1855

Permalink

The Goetic Circle of Black Evocations and Pacts, to summon Satan for a deal. The circle is formed from human skin, fastened by nails from a coffin of an executed criminal. A parricide’s skull, goat horns, a bat drowned in blood, and the head of a black cat who was fed human flesh must be placed around it. From The Book of Black Magic and Pacts, A.E. Waite, 1910. Source: Embassy of the Free Mind


📖 Purchase Book (affiliate link, free digital version linked above)

Permalink

Illustrations by Martin van Maële from the 1911 edition of the book Satanism and Witchcraft (La Sorcière) by Jules Michelet, first published in 1862. While widely inaccurate, the book was one of the first sympathetic portrayals of the history of witchcraft.


📖 Purchase Book (affiliate link, free digital version linked above)

Permalink

Baphomet is a goat headed demon (or deity depending who you ask) that embodies opposing binaries: they’re human and animal, male and female, good and evil. They’re the source of inspiration for the Devil card image in the Rider-Waite Tarot deck, and much Satanic imagery, and are a part of many occult and mystical traditions.⠀

Permalink

Dagol, The Prince of Darkness. The name Dagol doesn’t appear in any other grimoires or demonology books that I could find. His ‘Prince of Darkness’ designation leads one to believe it could be another name for Satan himself, however the demon Belial also bears that title. Though the source is quite old, it isn’t as old as it purports to be and was likely created for resale as a rare book, not as a genuine grimoire. Compendium Of Demonology and Magic, 1775.

Permalink