mythicalcreatures

The nuckelavee is a fearsome sea monster found on Scotland’s Northern Isles that, when on land, has been described as humanoid rider fused with a horse, skinless with black blood coursing through yellow veins. Its breath wilts crops and is responsible for epidemics and drought. Image: michael221 on Deviant Art CC-BY-SA

View Single Post

The Baku is an entity from Japanese mythology that eats nightmares. If you have a bad dream, call out to the Baku when you wake up. But don’t do it lightly, because if your nightmare leaves it hungry, it may eat your hopes and desires as well. Image: LACMA

View Single Post

The Alukah, also known as the “horse-leech”, is a giant and many toothed leech that, according to the Sefer Hasidim, takes human and wolf form. It’s possible that the word “leech” actually describes its blood feeding nature, not its appearance, and that the creature is more of a shape-shifting vampire. It can fly using its long hair and may be a descendant of Lilith.

View Single Post

Alchemical art dragib

This alchemical dragon diagram, from “Hermaphrodite Child of the Sun and Moon” by Johann Augustin Brunnhofer (1752), gives clues on how to transmute solids to liquids to gasses, using the elements of fire and air. The 7 indentations on the wings represent the 7 steps of the process. Source: The Embassy of the Free Mind

View Single Post

A harpy-type jinn that represents the southern constellation of Cetus. Harpies are dangerous half-human half-bird creatures, most famously seen in Greek and Roman mythology, but the creature archetype spans many cultures. From Quazwini’s Book of Marvels, 1283

View Single Post

An afarta is a jnoun (Tunisian jinn) of the air. It flies like a gust of wind and devours chickens, lambs, and small children. They’re among the most powerful jnoun and are responsible for possessions. From Marvels of Things Created and Miraculous Aspects of Things Existing 18th century. ⠀

View Single Post

A baharia is a jnoun (a pre-islamic jinn) of the sea. They live in opulent underwater palaces built from precious gems. When they grow tired of palace life, they will come to the surface to tease mariners. Usually they’re described as beautiful with pale skin and dark black hair, and with a full upper body of a human that is typical of mermen and mermaids—unlike the depiction here. From Marvels of Things Created and Miraculous Aspects of Things Existing, 18th century

View Single Post

A ghul is a nocturnal type of jinn that feeds off the flesh of travelers, children, and corpses. They inhabit graveyards, ruins and other lonely places. The female ghul (ghula) are especially feared because they can take the form of a beautiful woman to seduce their unsuspecting victims. From Shah Namah, the Persian Epic of the Kings, 10th century.⠀

View Single Post

Gaap or Tap is a fallen angel and one of the 72 spirits of Solomon. As an angel he belonged to the Order of Powers. He poses as a doctor to women and makes them lust after men. He has many other powers, including: stealing familiars from magicians, telling the past and future, teaching philosophy and liberal sciences, teleporting people from one country to another, making people invisible, causing people to go senseless, inspiring love and hatred, and consecrating under the dominion of the infernal king Amaimon. These abilities likely made him a popular demon to summon among conjurers. From Dictionnaire Infernal, 1863.⠀

View Single Post