FolkloreThursday

According to Kabbalah, when a person’s body decomposes or is cremated, a tiny bone at the base of the spine, called the luz, always remains intact. When the dead are resurrected, their physical bodies will reconstitute from this seed-like bone. Image: J. Gamelin, 1778⠀

View Single Post

The preeminent source of jinn-lore is One Thousand and One Nights (aka Arabian Nights), a collection of tales from Arabic, Persian, Egyptian and Mesopotamian traditions. The evolving collection has stories of characters we know today, like Aladdin and Sinbad.⠀

View Single Post

In the Sanskrit epic Ramayana, the hero Rama and his army of monkey and bears fight and slay many demons, including the demon king Ravana, who had 10 heads and 20 arms. The Ramayana (Tales of Rama; The Freer Ramayana), Volume 2, 1597 ⠀

View Single Post

Though jinn are normally thought of spirits of the desert, some types have been found lurking in the forest too. In the forests of Yemen, one might come across the nisnas or nasnas, a jinn that resembles a man split in half. Reportedly, their flesh tastes sweet.

View Single Post

Gamigin is a marquis who rules thirty legions of lesser demons. With his necromantic powers, he revives the souls of the dead who were drowned at sea or stuck in purgatory. The souls appear into airy, non-physical bodies, where they can be questioned. ⠀

View Single Post

Jinn prefer dwelling in deserted places like ruins or graveyards, but a corner of your house or your bathroom will do as well. While some jinn will guard your house, others will cause trouble. So it’s best to leave offerings, say prayers, and salt the corners. ⠀

View Single Post

Old Lady and the Devil is an American children’s song about a farmer who gives up his “scolding” wife to Satan. When demons come to take her, the Old Woman “beats out the(ir) brains”, but is ultimately taken away by The Devil in a sack. ⠀

View Single Post

Shax (or Chax) is a dark marquis of hell. He’s known for stealing horses and gold from kings, turning folks deaf and dumb, and revealing hidden things. Conjurers should be wary of receiving familiars from him, as they may share his wicked deceptive nature. Image: Dictionnaire Infernal ⠀

View Single Post

A Dulhath (Dalham, Dalhan, Delhan) is a jinn that inhabits desert islands. It rides an ostrich and feasts on the flesh of shipwrecked travelers who wash up on the shore. From: The Wonders of Creation, 16th Century⠀

View Single Post

A harpy-type jinn that represents the southern constellation of Cetus. Harpies are dangerous half-human half-bird creatures, most famously seen in Greek and Roman mythology, but the creature archetype spans many cultures. From Quazwini’s Book of Marvels, 1283

View Single Post

A succubus is a seductress demon across many traditions. They appear as either a beautiful woman or a terrifying demonic entity, and sometimes as a combination or switching between the two forms. Repeated sexual activity with a succubus causes deteriorating mental and physical health, and sometimes death. Art by Fritz Schwimbeck, 1915

View Single Post