Folklore and Superstition

In an Indian folktale, a Bodhisatta, known as the Prince of the Five Weapons, meets a demon, known as The Demon with Matted Hair, in a forest. Before it could devour him, the prince defeats the demon with discourse and reason, and turns him benevolent. Image: John Batten, 1892

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Rangda is the Demon Queen of the Leyaks, flying heads with dangling entrails, such as a heart and lungs, from Balinese folklore. They have long tongues and fangs, drink the blood of new born children, and feast on corpses in graveyards. At day, they appear human.

Image is an edit of a photo by Yves Picq, CC3 Attribution

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In Bengali folklore, a Shakchunni is the ghost of a married woman. They usually wear Shankha, the coral or shell bangles that they were given as a part of their wedding ceremony. In this picture, from a classic folklore book, the Shakchunni is spreading cow dung mixed with water.

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Old Lady and the Devil is an American children’s song about a farmer who gives up his “scolding” wife to Satan. When demons come to take her, the Old Woman “beats out the(ir) brains”, but is ultimately taken away by The Devil in a sack. ⠀

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